• Tatia Dolidze has been an affiliated analyst at GIP since October 2019. In parallel, Ms. Dolidze is an Assistant Professor and a Department Head at the International Relations Bachelors programme of the European University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Furthermore, since 2015 Ms. Dolidze has held the position of an invited lecturer at the University of Georgia, Tbilisi State University (TSU) and the Caucasus University teaching BA and MA courses in the direction of European Studies, while she has also worked as a trainer in public speaking for different educational establishments. She has been pursuing her PhD in European Studies at the Institute of European Studies at TSU, during which she spent a year at the Masaryk University in Brno. Previously, Ms. Dolidze held various positions including that of a Chief Counselor of the International Relations and Communications Department at the Office of the National Security Council of Georgia; a Georgian Youth Representative to the United Nations; a Research Assistant at the EU Foreign Policy Unit of the Center for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels, Belgium; and a trainee at the European Parliament, DG ERPS, Brussels, Belgium, among others. Ms. Dolidze has obtained a Masters Degree Cum Laude in European Studies from Maastricht University as an Open Society Foundation Scholar; and a Bachelors Degree in International Relations with distinction from Tbilisi State University. She has additionally undertaken short-term non-degree studies at the University of Siena in Italy and at the University of Vilnius in Lithuania. Apart from Georgian, which is her native language, Ms. Dolidze is fluent in French, Italian, English and Russian languages, and speaks intermediate Spanish.

27/03/2017 Tatia Dolidze

“Domine, quo vadis?” – Georgian Vulnerability to the EU’s Uncertain Future

Author

  • Tatia Dolidze has been an affiliated analyst at GIP since October 2019. In parallel, Ms. Dolidze is an Assistant Professor and a Department Head at the International Relations Bachelors programme of the European University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Furthermore, since 2015 Ms. Dolidze has held the position of an invited lecturer at the University of Georgia, Tbilisi State University (TSU) and the Caucasus University teaching BA and MA courses in the direction of European Studies, while she has also worked as a trainer in public speaking for different educational establishments. She has been pursuing her PhD in European Studies at the Institute of European Studies at TSU, during which she spent a year at the Masaryk University in Brno. Previously, Ms. Dolidze held various positions including that of a Chief Counselor of the International Relations and Communications Department at the Office of the National Security Council of Georgia; a Georgian Youth Representative to the United Nations; a Research Assistant at the EU Foreign Policy Unit of the Center for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels, Belgium; and a trainee at the European Parliament, DG ERPS, Brussels, Belgium, among others. Ms. Dolidze has obtained a Masters Degree Cum Laude in European Studies from Maastricht University as an Open Society Foundation Scholar; and a Bachelors Degree in International Relations with distinction from Tbilisi State University. She has additionally undertaken short-term non-degree studies at the University of Siena in Italy and at the University of Vilnius in Lithuania. Apart from Georgian, which is her native language, Ms. Dolidze is fluent in French, Italian, English and Russian languages, and speaks intermediate Spanish.


Publish Date:
27-03-2017

Europe is both celebrating and commiserating the 60th anniversary of the Rome treaties as it coincides with the biggest identity crisis the Union has witnessed since the signing of those treaties. On March 25, 2017, heads of state and government and the presidents of the EU institutions met in Rome for a summit to adopt a declaration on the future of Europe—a future which now looks uncertain.

Signing of the Treaties of Rome, 25 March 1957

Encouraged by the Brexit vote and further validated by Donald Trump’s presidential election win, nationalistic sentiments have spread across the Euro-Atlantic area in a “domino effect.” Europe’s modern nationalism follows the Anglo-American beat (“America first”; “Take back control”) and is populist, anti-Islam, anti-migrant, and anti-EU.

Now, all eyes are on the French presidential elections in April, the outcome of which is expected to determine whether Brexit remains sui generis or sets a precedent feared by Europhiles. Either France in one month, or Germany with the outcome of its federal elections in September, is to decide the fate of the Union.

Author

  • Tatia Dolidze has been an affiliated analyst at GIP since October 2019. In parallel, Ms. Dolidze is an Assistant Professor and a Department Head at the International Relations Bachelors programme of the European University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Furthermore, since 2015 Ms. Dolidze has held the position of an invited lecturer at the University of Georgia, Tbilisi State University (TSU) and the Caucasus University teaching BA and MA courses in the direction of European Studies, while she has also worked as a trainer in public speaking for different educational establishments. She has been pursuing her PhD in European Studies at the Institute of European Studies at TSU, during which she spent a year at the Masaryk University in Brno. Previously, Ms. Dolidze held various positions including that of a Chief Counselor of the International Relations and Communications Department at the Office of the National Security Council of Georgia; a Georgian Youth Representative to the United Nations; a Research Assistant at the EU Foreign Policy Unit of the Center for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels, Belgium; and a trainee at the European Parliament, DG ERPS, Brussels, Belgium, among others. Ms. Dolidze has obtained a Masters Degree Cum Laude in European Studies from Maastricht University as an Open Society Foundation Scholar; and a Bachelors Degree in International Relations with distinction from Tbilisi State University. She has additionally undertaken short-term non-degree studies at the University of Siena in Italy and at the University of Vilnius in Lithuania. Apart from Georgian, which is her native language, Ms. Dolidze is fluent in French, Italian, English and Russian languages, and speaks intermediate Spanish.

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Tatia Dolidze

Tatia Dolidze has been an affiliated analyst at GIP since October 2019. In parallel, Ms. Dolidze is an Assistant Professor and a Department Head at the International Relations Bachelors programme of the European University, Tbilisi, Georgia. Furthermore, since 2015 Ms. Dolidze has held the position of an invited lecturer at the University of Georgia, Tbilisi State University (TSU) and the Caucasus University teaching BA and MA courses in the direction of European Studies, while she has also worked as a trainer in public speaking for different educational establishments. She has been pursuing her PhD in European Studies at the Institute of European Studies at TSU, during which she spent a year at the Masaryk University in Brno. Previously, Ms. Dolidze held various positions including that of a Chief Counselor of the International Relations and Communications Department at the Office of the National Security Council of Georgia; a Georgian Youth Representative to the United Nations; a Research Assistant at the EU Foreign Policy Unit of the Center for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels, Belgium; and a trainee at the European Parliament, DG ERPS, Brussels, Belgium, among others. Ms. Dolidze has obtained a Masters Degree Cum Laude in European Studies from Maastricht University as an Open Society Foundation Scholar; and a Bachelors Degree in International Relations with distinction from Tbilisi State University. She has additionally undertaken short-term non-degree studies at the University of Siena in Italy and at the University of Vilnius in Lithuania. Apart from Georgian, which is her native language, Ms. Dolidze is fluent in French, Italian, English and Russian languages, and speaks intermediate Spanish.