Author

  • Nino Samkharadze

    Nino Samkharadze is a Junior Policy Analyst at GIP. At the same time, she is a PhD student at Tbilisi State University, Department of Political Science. She has obtained MA degree in Nationalism and Ethnicity Studies from TSU and BA degree in International Relations from International Black Sea University (IBSU). Being an invited lecturer at IBSU she delivers courses in Introduction to Political Science and Nationalism in International Relations. Nino’s research interests include nationalism, identity politics and their influence on political processes in the post-Soviet region.

13/04/2023 Nino Samkharadze

Women’s Political Empowerment and Georgia’s Democratisation: Why is Parliament’s Inclusivity Important?

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Author

  • Nino Samkharadze

    Nino Samkharadze is a Junior Policy Analyst at GIP. At the same time, she is a PhD student at Tbilisi State University, Department of Political Science. She has obtained MA degree in Nationalism and Ethnicity Studies from TSU and BA degree in International Relations from International Black Sea University (IBSU). Being an invited lecturer at IBSU she delivers courses in Introduction to Political Science and Nationalism in International Relations. Nino’s research interests include nationalism, identity politics and their influence on political processes in the post-Soviet region.

Publish Date:
13-04-2023

An inclusive political process is a primary factor in Georgia’s Europeanisation. One of the main components of inclusivity is the political empowerment of women and the increasing of their involvement in the decision-making processes. In March 2023, parliamentary discussions on the so-called “Agent’s Law” demonstrated positive impacts that can be brought into the political processes by the involvement of female politicians. Therefore, on the path to the European Union, studying and encouraging their role in the working of parliament is important. A number of reforms have been implemented in Georgia that are aimed at strengthening the political participation of women. As a result, the number of female representatives in political institutions has increased. However, this is not enough to ensure that they participate in the decision-making processes: given the polarised political environment and stereotypical views in the country, there are still many challenges that women in parliament face.

This policy brief examines how women’s involvement can benefit the country on its path to Europe, what specific challenges face women working in Parliament and what can be done to overcome them. Firstly, this brief assesses women’s representation in Parliament. Then it analyses the distinct strengths of women politicians that enable them to contribute to a healthy political process. The next part identifies problems that hinder women in their parliamentary work. Lastly, the policy brief offers recommendations to the relevant actors – the Georgian Parliament, political parties and women politicians in Georgia – that could help overcome these challenges.

Key Words: The Parliament of Georgia, Women Members of the Parliament (MP), Women voters.

Policy Brief #47 | April 2023

This publication has been produced from the resources provided by the “ Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (SFDFA)”. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (SFDFA) and the Georgian Institute of Politics.
Photo Credit: Netgazeti
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Nino Samkharadze

Nino Samkharadze is a Junior Policy Analyst at GIP. At the same time, she is a PhD student at Tbilisi State University, Department of Political Science. She has obtained MA degree in Nationalism and Ethnicity Studies from TSU and BA degree in International Relations from International Black Sea University (IBSU). Being an invited lecturer at IBSU she delivers courses in Introduction to Political Science and Nationalism in International Relations. Nino’s research interests include nationalism, identity politics and their influence on political processes in the post-Soviet region.